Understanding Cholesterol

What is Cholesterol?

Beyond Cholesterol
Scientists have learned that other substances may give you and your doctor new clues about your heart disease risk. And that's good news. Coronary heart disease, in which fatty deposits build up in your arteries, is the nation's top killer.
The Truth About Triglycerides
Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in your body. Most of your body's fat is stored as triglycerides.

Why Control Cholesterol

For Your Heart's Sake, Lower Your Cholesterol
High cholesterol contributes to heart disease, which kills more Americans than all cancers combined.
Atherosclerosis
Atherosclerosis is a type of arteriosclerosis caused by a build-up of plaque in the inner lining of an artery.
Coronary Heart Disease
A person with coronary heart disease has an accumulation of fatty deposits in the coronary arteries. These deposits narrow the arteries and can decrease or block the flow of blood to the heart.
Helping to Prevent a Second Heart Attack
Most Americans survive a first heart attack. By taking action, however, they can significantly reduce their chances for a second heart attack.
Diabetes and Heart Disease
Diabetes affects the cardiovascular system, but many problems aren't apparent until a person has a heart attack or stroke.
Metabolic Syndrome
Most people who have metabolic syndrome have insulin resistance. This may be a beginning of the development of type 2 diabetes.
Risk Factors for Stroke
The most important controllable risk factor for stroke is controlling high blood pressure. Blood pressure of 140/90 or higher can damage the arteries that supply blood to the brain.

Strategies for Managing Cholesterol

All About Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs
According to the American Heart Association, there are five main types of cholesterol-lowering medications.
Heart Disease Worksheet
It's important to get regular checkups and periodic exams, especially when you have cardiovascular disease.
Cut Your Cholesterol, Without Drugs
People with a strong genetic predisposition to high cholesterol need medication to control cholesterol. But a lot of us don't.
Anger Can Raise Cholesterol Levels
There's evidence that people who respond rigidly to anger-provoking events are likely to wind up with significantly elevated levels of heart-damaging cholesterol.